NATIONAL METHAMPHETAMINE TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER
Nationwide epidemic
Nationwide epidemic
About the center
NATIONAL METHAMPHETAMINE TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER
Nationwide epidemic
Nationwide epidemic
INSIDE THE EPIDEMIChttp://www.websitetoolbox.com/mb/cfruitrich
Meth landscape seldom looks the same for long
One thing that has characterized the methamphetamine scourge is change. As seen below, when labs decline, imports rise and though seizures are up, arrests are down.
A snapshot look at shifting meth statistics as though all began at 100% in 2004:
   2004             2005             2006            2007             2008              2009           2010
Seizures along SW border                               DEA meth arrests
Clandestine meth lab busts                              DEA meth seizures (all)
Small victories in a battle do not win the war

As the 21st century dawned, methamphetamine was the nation's most feared illegal drug, creeping into nearly all corners of the country.

Lawmakers took action by forcing medications containing meth precursor ingredients -- particularly pseudoephedrine -- to be limited. Starting in 2005, the number of clandestine labs cooking meth dropped and weary anti-meth groups celebrated.

Unfortunately, use of the drug did not go away and Mexican drug cartels were only too happy to import all that was needed.

Today the growing abuse of prescription drugs has replaced meth in the headlines. But once again, the methamphetamine threat remains real. For example:
-- In 2009, for the first time in half a decade, the number of first-time meth users rose significantly.
-- Meth labs have reemerged and in places like Tennessee, increased to record levels.
-- The amount of meth seized from smugglers at the Mexican border is at the highest level in more than five years.

So the fight goes on.