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NATIONAL METHAMPHETAMINE TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER
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Latest news: 07-27-2010


Little meth decline seen in rural areas of Wis.

WI - Methamphetamine, an easy-to-make and highly addictive drug prevalent in rural parts of Wisconsin and the country, isn't found in the state as much now as it was five years ago. But meth lab busts have been on the rise since last year, and some rural law enforcement officials say the drug remains their top threat. "There's still a big demand for it," said Cindy Giese, a meth expert and special agent in charge with the state Department of Justice. "In the rural areas, we have never seen much of a decline."

Full story, The Wisconsin State Journal


Meth’s new method raises danger

MO - It’s cheap, easy and dangerous. And it’s exploding — in some cases literally — across Missouri from the rural Bootheel to urban Kansas City. A new way to produce methamphetamine, unseen here a year ago, is becoming the preferred way for users to get a quick high and is fueling an increase in meth-related police activity after several years of decline. “We’re getting hammered with this,” said Sgt. Tim Witcig of the Kansas City Police Department’s metro meth section. “It’s about 90 percent of what we’re getting right now.”

Full story, The Kansas City Star


Moonshine stills part of history; meth labs a present-day nightmare

TN - At age 74, Johnny Burch of Dunlap in Sequatchie County remembers when moonshiners hid their stills in nearby mountains. He compares the moonshine whiskey  — “white lightning” and “shine” in street lingo — of yesteryear to the methamphetamine, or “meth,” epidemic of today. “You could take an alcoholic and multiply many times over what moonshine did to him, and you’d never come close to what meth does,” he said.

Full story, The Union City Messenger


Agencies discuss how to aid families displaced by meth labs

KS - Whether it be a fire, flood or other natural disaster, the American Red Cross traditionally is on the scene to assist displaced victims. But what if the displaced are the innocent victims of a drug bust? Last March, a methamphetamine raid at an apartment house at 116 W. Jewell led to a dilemma for local Red Cross officials.

Full story, The Salina Journal


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