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Latest news: 11-29-2010







First state to pass pseudoephedrine restrictions see's success

OK - More than 68,000 sales of pseudoephedrine were blocked at Oklahoma pharmacies during the year after legislators tightened state laws to reduce methamphetamine production. State drug agents say that shows that the law did what it was supposed to by keeping the crucial ingredient out of the hands of many meth cooks.  "We ran those names (of those whose purchases were blocked), and more than 50 percent had criminal records, including many with meth convictions," said Mark Woodward, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. "So that told us what we already suspected: Some of the people who are trying to buy the pseudoephedrine are not just cold sufferers."

Full story, Tulsa World





Men charged in conspiracy to mail meth-soaked papers into prisons

WA - Two Bellingham men have been charged in federal court with conspiring to mail papers soaked in methamphetamine to inmates in state prisons. A complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle alleges that Joseph L. Garcia, 31, supplied ounces of meth to Kirk L. Rishor, 47, who in turn soaked the drugs into high-quality, cotton-fiber paper. Once the papers dried and a price had been negotiated with an inmate, Rishor allegedly put them into manila envelopes filled with other legal paperwork and mailed it to the prison, according to the complaint.

Full story, Tacoma News Tribune





Meth lab discoveries at all-time high

KY - Kentucky is on track to record more than 1,000 illegal methamphetamine labs in 2010, despite years of escalating efforts to control production and abuse of the highly addictive drug.  That would be the most labs ever found in the state.That record is certain to help drive debate in the 2011 legislative session about a proposal to require a prescription for the cold and allergy drug that addicts and traffickers use to make meth.

Full story, The Lexington Herlad-Leader





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